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starting at $59.99 starting at $100 Alignments Brakes
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4703 University Drive NW
Huntsville, Alabama
256-721-9130

10033 Memorial Pky SW
Huntsville, Alabama
256-882-0937

2450 Government St.
Mobile, Alabama
251-479-1550

6408 Airport Blvd.
Mobile, Alabama
251-304-1077

4709 Mobile Hwy
Pensacola, Florida
850-457-6727

5345 Charlotte Ave
Nashville, Tennessee
615-460-7200

1006 Carmack Blvd (S of Downtown Columbia)
Columbia, Tennessee
931-398-3350

4537 Nolensville Pike
Nashville, Tennessee
615-445-8070

4700 Gallatin Pike
Nashville, Tennessee
615-228-1376

4330 Lebanon Pike
Hermitage, Tennessee
615-886-1210

111 NW Broad Street
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
615-907-7055

821 North 2nd Street
Clarksville, Tennessee
931-906-2700

3903 Brainerd Road
Chattanooga, Tennessee
423-624-3370

5233 Hixson Pike
Hixson, Tennessee
423-870-9940

8033 Kingston Pike
Knoxville, Tennessee
865-690-0600

2504 N. Broadway St.
Knoxville, Tennessee
865-525-0200

Why Choose Budget Brakes?

At Budget Brakes our goal is simple: Provide you with great auto service, quality parts at low prices, and back it all up with a guarantee.

Our Brake Services

Our Frequently Asked Questions

The following is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for a comprehensive brake system inspection by a Budget Brakes Certified Safety Expert. Visit your local Budget Brakes today for a free visual inspection of your brake system.

Knowing when your brakes need to be repaired can be confusing that is why we like to educate our customers and give you common warning signs that your brakes need attention.
Brake Warning Signs:

PULL: Vehicle pulls to one side when brakes are applied.

GRAB: “Touchy” brakes that grab with the least amount of pressure.

DRAG: Sticking brakes, hot wheels or engine, which seems to have lost power.

SQUEAL: Some brake noise is normal; however, constant groaning, grinding or squealing is not.

LOW PEDAL: Pedal nearly touches the floorboard before brakes function.

HARD PEDAL: Requires an extreme amount of pressure to make brakes function.

VIBRATION: Brake pedal, steering wheel or entire vehicle shakes, vibrates or pulses when brake is applied.

MILAGE: Brakes are “out of sight, out of mind.” Remember yours at least once a year, even if none of the above symptoms are present.

BRAKE WARNING LIGHT: Emergency brake is on, low brake fluid or a drop in Hydraulic pressure.

Brake fluid is one of the most important components in the brake system. Brake fluid is formulated to tolerate moisture absorption, control rubber expansion and corrosion, and acts as a lubricant. It also must not boil or freeze in brake systems over a wide range of operating temperatures. Typically the level is checked when you get an oil change but very seldom does it get completely replaced unless the vehicles braking system undergoes a major overhaul. Brake fluid deteriorates with age due to moisture and contamination.

Also keep in mind when you use your brakes, heat is generated at the friction contact points. As your vehicle sits, your brakes cool down. Therefore, over a period of time the heating and cooling action of your brake system will condense moisture in the closed hydraulics system. DOT 3 and DOT 4 brake fluid will absorb that water and keep it from effecting hydraulic components and helps prevent or at least slow down the corrosive effect. Even though brake fluid absorbs moisture, it cannot continue to absorb it indefinitely, which is why it is suggested that you bleed the system and refill with fresh brake fluid once every 2 years or every 24,000 miles, whichever comes first.

Brakes eventually wear out and need to be replaced, which is why Budget Brakes is in business. However, as a driver there are some strategic things you can do to increase the life of your brakes.

Speed Kills. Stops from high speed are the mortal enemy of brakes. And a little more speed hurts more than you can imagine. Stopping from 65 mph rather than 55 forces the brakes to dissipate about a third more energy.

No Lefties. Only use your right foot on the brake pedal. By braking with only your right foot, you’ll avoid simultaneously pushing both pedals.

Be a Coaster. Coasting is a surprisingly easy way to get rid of a lot of brake-killing speed. If you know you’ll have to stop at the end of a freeway off-ramp, coasting from 70 down to 50 before you brake will significantly reduce brake wear.
Memory Factor. Memorize places where other drivers inappropriately slow down. Examples include hills and gentle freeway bends that many mistake for hairpin turns. Often, you’ll have to coast down to their pace. Plan ahead and you might be able to change lanes around them. They’ll re-pass you on the next downhill or straightaway, but you will have used less brakes and gas.

Look Up and Save. Look far enough ahead and you’ll be able to correctly time stoplights, notice traffic backing up or see cars slowing on an incline that’s just become visible. Look beyond the next traffic signal and check out the one after that.

Don’t Join In. Many drivers brake just because the guy in front did, and sometimes the first driver touched his brake for no good reason. It’ll take a bit of practice to learn to coast when others brake inappropriately, especially if you weren’t looking far enough ahead.

Lose Some Weight. Don’t carry unnecessary stuff. Math majors will point out that this won’t make a big difference unless you’re hauling those barbells you keep forgetting to drop off at Goodwill.  Consider vehicle weight before your next purchase. A heavier vehicle is harder on brakes, tires and gas.

Flush It. Brake fluid needs to be periodically changed. In mechanic-speak it’s called bleeding and flushing. Renew your brake fluid, especially if you have an older vehicle or one you purchased used. You gain nothing if you save brake material but the insides of the system rot away. Flushing the brake fluid will make the internal components last longer and the brakes work better. Brake fluid naturally attracts water.

In an emergency stop or after repeated brake applications, this moisture boils and severely reduces braking effectiveness. Moisture also promotes internal corrosion, which ruins critical rubber seals. Some vehicle manufacturers recommend renewing brake fluid every couple of years. While there are mechanics that challenge its cost-effectiveness, brake bleeding is an inexpensive, easy task for a do-it-yourselfer.

Be Frugal, Not Foolish. Trying to extend brake life too long will cost big money. If metal touches metal, frugality becomes foolish. A good time to inspect brake material thickness is when you have your tires rotated. Novice do-it-yourselfers: With a wheel removed, it’s easy to check disc brake pad thickness, as they’re open for viewing. It’s more difficult with drum brakes because the drum has to be removed.

Brake fluid is one of the most important components in the brake system. Brake fluid is formulated to tolerate moisture absorption, control rubber expansion and corrosion, and acts as a lubricant. It also must not boil or freeze in brake systems over a wide range of operating temperatures. Typically the level is checked when you get an oil change but very seldom does it get completely replaced unless the vehicles braking system undergoes a major overhaul. Brake fluid deteriorates with age due to moisture and contamination.

Also keep in mind when you use your brakes, heat is generated at the friction contact points. As your vehicle sits, your brakes cool down. Therefore, over a period of time the heating and cooling action of your brake system will condense moisture in the closed hydraulics system. DOT 3 and DOT 4 brake fluid will absorb that water and keep it from effecting hydraulic components and helps prevent or at least slow down the corrosive effect. Even though brake fluid absorbs moisture, it cannot continue to absorb it indefinitely, which is why it is suggested that you bleed the system and refill with fresh brake fluid once every 2 years or every 24,000 miles, whichever comes first.

comes first.

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